Is corruption a necessary evil in democracy? Do the public encourage corruption by accepting it as a way of life? Because nothing gets done without bribing the government servants.

Are all government officials in India corrupt?

No. Some people like S. K. Dubey and Manjunathan even risk their lives for being different and trying to expose the network of corrupt practices.

In India, top government job means power, status and easy life. But, there is also another factor- the wealth top bureaucrats can accumulate through bribes. If an official is not corrupt at the start of his/her career, he/she becomes one over the years.

But not all. Here is a brave and committed IAS officer, M.N. Vijayakumar, from Bangalore, who has been fighting corruption all his career spanning 26 years. He’s been very systematic. Unlike the two officials mentioned above, he’s been lucky.

The officer’s pillar of support is his wife. She has turned to blogging last year in order to let the world know in detail about their activities. Wide reach of information will also discourage their enemies, she believes. (Link to her blog).

Since he’s a part of the system, he knows it inside out. One of the methods he’s adopted in his fight against corruption, Right to Information Act (RTI), is a provision in the system itself. 

Now they are compiling the names of clean officials so that people can approach them straight away for getting their work done without bribing.

His wife says they have been successful to a certain extent. She says,

“There are plenty of honest people in government who support us secretly, but they are afraid to speak out; some tell us that they will help us when they retire…Several officers have now pledged in writing that they will no longer accept bribes.” (Link)

Frequent transfers, threats of kidnapping and murder and numerous other kinds of harassment have only emboldened them.

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